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Chlamydia and Gonorrhea

This site contains STD/HIV/Viral Hepatitis prevention messages that may not be appropriate for all ages.

                                         

 

You Need to Know

 

FACT ON CHLAMYDIA

  • Chlamydia is the fastest growing STD in the United States.
  • Chlamydia is a bacteria in sexual fluids or discharge passed from an infected person by vaginal or anal sex. Oral infections can occur through oral sex with an infected person.
  • Transmission can occur from mother to infant during birth.
  • Women may experience unusual vaginal discharge, frequent or painful urination, pain in the lower abdomen and/or bleeding between menstrual periods or after intercourse.
  • Men may experience discharge from the penis, frequent or painful urination or burning at the tip of the penis.
  • Many people with Chlamydia have no symptoms.
  • Chlamydia is cured with antibiotics.

 

What happens if chlamydia is untreated?

An untreated chlamydia infection can spread to a woman's uterus or fallopian tubes and cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). PID can lead to permanent damage, chronic pelvic pain, infertility and pregnancies outside the uterus. Women infected with chlamydia are five times more likely to become infected with HIV, if exposed.

Complications in men are rare and range from pain and fever to sterility.

 

How is chlamydia diagnosed?

Panhandle Health District tests for chlamydia in women with either a cervical swab or a urine test. Men take a urine test and shouldn't urinate for two hours prior to their test appointment.  Family Planning recommends scheduling an appointment for a pelvic exam or male exam with PHD's nurse practitioner. PHD helps patients with positive results inform their partners.

 

How is chlamydia treated?

When test results are positive, PHD's nurse practitioner prescribes antibiotics.

 

 

FACTS ON GONORRHEA

  • Gonorrhea is a bacteria in sexual fluids or discharge passed from an infected person by vaginal or anal sex. Transmission can occur through oral sex with an infected person.
  • Transmission can occur from mother to infant during birth.
  • Many people with Gonorrhea have no symptoms.
  • Women can experience unusual vaginal discharge, frequent or painful urination, pain in the lower abdomen and/or bleeding between menstrual cycles or after intercourse.
  • Men may experience discharge from the penis, frequent or painful urination or burning at the tip of the penis.
  • Gonorrhea can be cured with antibiotics.

 

What complications does gonorrhea cause?

In women, untreated gonorrhea can cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). About 1 million women each year in the United States develop PID. PID can lead to permanent damage, chronic pelvic pain, infertility and pregnancies outside the uterus.  In men, gonorrhea can cause pain in the testicles that may lead to infertility. People with gonorrhea can contract HIV more easily.

 

How is gonorrhea diagnosed?

PHD tests women with a cervical swab or a urine test. Men take a urine test and shouldn't urinate for at least two hours before their appointment. Family Planning recommends a pelvic exam for women or a male exam with PHD's nurse practitioner. PHD helps patients with positive results inform their partners.

 

How is gonorrhea treated?

When test results are positive, PHD's nurse practitioner prescribes antibiotics.

 

For an appointment in the PHD office in your county, call:

 

 

 

 



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